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092016_YKMV_A15.pdf



shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com September 20, 2016 • Page 15 Support for Dementia Caregivers BROOKINGS, S.D. - SDSU Extension in collaboration with Regional Health, Western Resources for Independent Living and Caregivers by Active Generation is launching the first Dementia Stress Busting workshop October 4, 2016 in Rapid City. There is no cost to attend this workshop. Space is limited. Pre-registration is required. To register, call 605.755.7726. “Caring for a family member with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia can be a very long and difficult assignment,” said Chad Ratigan, Executive Director, Western Resources for Independent Living. “This labor of love often leaves caregivers feeling extremely stressed and isolated.” Stressbusters is an evidence based program that can give a caregiver useful information and tools to help manage stress and maintain their own health. “The small group of participants gains knowledge of the many aspects of caregiving and receives encouragement from the facilitators and those who are walking the same path,” explained Leacey E. Brown, SDSU Extension Gerontology Field Specialist. “Attendees learn stress management techniques, relaxation and coping strategies.” Dementia Stress Busting is a 9-week program designed for the ability Resource Connections at 855.315.1986. family caregivers of people living with dementia. A small group Are you a professional serving people with dementia? SDSU of caregivers meet for an hour and a half each week. Extension and Caregivers by Active Generation is hosting a Each attendee will receive a Stress-Busting Program for Fam- Stress Busting Question and Answer event on September 23, ily Caregivers™ book. 2016, from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. (MT). Concerned about leaving a loved one alone while attending Professionals will have the opportunity to review the curricuclass? Options are available. Adult Day and Home care orga- lum and learn more about this evidence-based program. nizations across Western South Dakota provide respite care For additional information, contact Brown at the SDSU Extenso family caregivers can engage in activities such as attend- sion Rapid City Regional Center at 605.394.1722. niGrow ing workshops, shopping or medical needs. Please visit the Helpline CenCOLLECTIBLES • CAR • HOUSEHOLD • MISC. ter website to view the Western South Dakota Caregiver Resource guide to learn more about day centers and home care options in our region. If you are concerned about starts at Lunch On ability to pay for respite care, Grounds 10:30am please call the Aging & DisLOCATION: 1310 E. 4th Street - CROFTON, NE AUCTION Sunday, September 25, 2016 Uncertainty in Current Climate Outlook BROOKINGS, S.D. - Climate outlooks for the remainder of the fall season turned less certain this week, as the likelihood of La Nina has been reduced, explained Laura Edwards, Acting State Climatologist and SDSU Extension Climate Field Specialist. “As of September 8, 2016 NOAA’s (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration’s) Climate Prediction Center removed their La Nina Watch status, and are now favoring Neutral conditions,” Edwards said. She explained that El Nino and La Nina are generally the best long-term forecast indicators for the late fall and winter season.  “For the last several months, computer models and forecasters had been projecting a weak La Nina to affect our climate in North America this winter, following the strong El Nino from earlier this year. With the status removed, it makes climate predicting a little less certain,” Edwards said. Neutral conditions means sea surface temperatures in the equatorial region of the Pacific Ocean, and other atmosphere and ocean indicators, are near the long-term average.  La Nina is when ocean waters are cooler than average in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, with sustained temperatures of just under 1 degree Fahrenheit cooler than average for three consecutive months.  September 15, 2016 Climate Outlook The climate outlook for October and the season ahead was issued by NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center on September 15, 2016.  Edwards said this update continues to show warmer than average temperatures favored in South Dakota for the month ahead. “This outlook is given with a little less certainty than we had seen in previous outlooks,” she said.  The precipitation outlook for October is also less clear for the state, as it is in a region that has equal probability of being wetter, drier or near average for the month. “This could be good news for eastern region farmers who are looking for some warm and dry, or even near average rainfall, conditions to help dry down corn and soybeans for harvest,” Edwards said. She added that the outlook could be less ideal news for western and central region growers, who are looking for some rainfall to help start winter wheat this fall.  “Despite some much-needed rainfall in August, many areas could still benefit from additional moisture to recover from the significant drought that took hold this summer,” she said. “Fall moisture could also help with pasture and forage conditions, and set the stage for the early spring.” Looking further ahead, Edwards said according to the Climate Prediction Center, the rest of the year could continue to be warmer than average. “This has been a consistent feature of 2016, as the year so far has been warmer than average for South Dakota,” she said.  Precipitation for the rest of the year has become more uncertain, partly due to the reduced probability of La Nina that generally affects the Northern Rockies and can spill over into the western Dakotas.  “South Dakota now sits just east of an area that is still favored to be wetter than average, with no clear signals for precipitation in our area,” she said. Since La Nina has become less likely than neutral conditions, Edwards explained that for the rest of the fall and winter season ahead, climatologists will be looking at a handful of other atmospheric and oceanic patterns.  “There are other patterns that can affect us, both from the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, and how they drive the jet stream in the winter season,” she said. This winter, climate forecasters will likely be looking closer at some shorter term changes in the climate, on the timescales of three to four weeks to a couple of months.  niGrow Shirley Mischke Estate Barry Mischke 402.369.4902 Auctioneers Note: If you are a marble collector you will want to attend this auction. Gordon was very active in marble collecting. COLLECTIBLES 1998 Buick LeSabre 4-Longhorn Mounts Marbles of all kinds and colors such as John Deere, Ford, American Flag, Sulfite, Mickey Mouse, Tiger Eyes, Coca Cola 151,613 miles, Clean Marble Kalidescope Redwing 5-gallon crock JD 125 Years Complimentary Indian Head Pennies 1893 and 1901 (3 Little Indians) 4-JD Pocket Knives JD 150th Anniversary Ink Pen Deer Head Mounts Elk Antlers From Weigand Creek, Unique Exercycle (electric exercise bike) Collectible Plates Turtle Shells Ivory Harness Rings (Red, White & Blue Colored) Canes, Hiking Stick Several Stetson Hats Hat Pins Tony Lama Boots, several pairs Collectible Bears Several Native American Pictures Elephant Collectibles Dice - Colt, Smith and Wesson, Winchester 5-gallon Glass Jugs Indian Arrow Heads Japanese Glass Floats Crofton Centennial Rolling Pin (1992) Costume Jewelry Petrified Wood in Display Case Bell Collection Pheasant Picture by Darrell Bush 1984 Brass Horse from Quarter Horse Association Cardboard Canadian Goose Decoys (fold out, several) HOUSEHOLD Couch and Love Seat End Tables Lamps Couch with Recliners Sony 25” TV Kitchen Table with 6 Chairs Hutch Lazy Boy Recliner Full Size Bed with Dresser Lift Chair Double Bed with Dresser Double Bed with 6-Drawer Dresser Whirlpool Washer & Dryer (Near New) Computer Desk Wall Décor Silverware Kitchen Utensils Lowrey Electric Keyboard Bedding 4-New Sleeping Bags Many Knick Knacks and Collectibles Horse Equipment Like New Saddle New Blanket & Bridle Enclosed Gun Case Box full of empty plastic ammo cases Fishing Equipment 2 Snagging Poles Much fishing & hunting equipment view pictures at www.edhuwaldt.com TERMS of the sale are cash or check. All items are sold as is, where is, with no guarantee or warranty implied. All statements made day of sale take precedence over written materials. Not responsible for injury or theft. AUCTIONEERS & CLERKS: Kelly Konken 402.254.3472 Ed Huwaldt Tony Thelen 402.337.0784 402.360.2039 Keep the numbers of these locally owned businesses on hand for all your service and shopping needs. 605-665-2957 Harry Lane, Electrical Contractor • SERVICE • SALES • REPAIRS •Commercial • Residential • Farm Wiring • Prompt Service • Quality Work • Competitive Prices New Construction or Remodeling • SIGNS OF ALL KINDS • VINYL LETTERING • DIGITAL PRINTING & MORE 3206 E. Hwy. 50 • Yankton, SD Home: 665-6612 Cell: 661-1040 We Work with All Insurance Companies “Don’t Gamble” - Insure With M.T. & R.C. SMITH INSURANCE Got PAINS? Keep your Postivite Attitude In Negative Situations And call the Collision Center today! 204 W. 4th St. • P Box 1077 .O. Yankton, SD 57078 Downtown Yankton Since 1949 605-665-3611 665-7670 East Hwy. 50 Yankton, SD 267-7670 Washington St. Gayville, SD ll 24/7 on ca AUTO UNLOCK 24/7 Emergency Service Fast Low Rates 1915 Broadway Yankton, SD 605-689-CRAP (2727) I sell results! Contact Jim Gevens (605)665-5884 jim.gevens@yankton.net To advertise in our next specialty business directory, call the Missouri Valley Shopper at 605-665-5884.
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