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shop online at www.missourivalleyshopper.com “Comin’ up on Saint Paddy’s Day, boys,” Windy said, coming in on final approach to an empty chair. Perfect two-point landing. Loretta filled his cup with fresh and he reared back and addressed the members of the Mule Barn truck stop’s world dilemma think tank. “Almost here, yessir. But this one ain’t gonna be like the last one … not by a strong shot. Lead us not into configuration, thass what I always say.” Well, yes he does, actually. In fact, expanding the world’s vocabulary seems to be the life mission of our old cowboy camp cook and philosopher, Alphonse “Windy” Wilson. And dang, he’s good at it. “What happened last St. Patrick’s Day, Windy?” asked Doc, politely. And then we braced ourselves for his answer. “Wellsir, there I were, boys, findin’ myself in the capital city on Saint Paddy’s Day and I were jest walkin’ along, peruvulatin’ the sidewalks, as it were, when I chanced upon a publication house. Thass what they call ‘em in Ireland, you know. So I rears back and walks on in. Boys, the party was on all right. There was Irishers ever-where! One of ‘em, a big booger, comes over and says to buy him a beer, cuz I’m the only one in there who hasn’t bought him one, yet.” “Did you buy him one, Windy?” “Do I look stoo-pid? A-course I did. And I danced a little jig and had a couple myself. And ‘bout that time here come that big ol’ drunk guy again and he said it were time to buy him another beer. I told him I didn’t have no more money, and that’s when I found myself out on the sidewalk, the whole eastern side of my face hurtin’ somethin’ fierce. Then I remembered that little sign they had in there. Had it right over the bar. It said, “If you ain’t a mick, you’re gonna get sick.” Them Irish is right ever now and then.” March 19, 2019 • Page 3 National Emergency Declaration: A Primer By Sen. Mike Rounds Congress and the administration have been in a months-long debate over border barrier funding. In fact, it was this debate that led to the longest partial government shutdown in our history. The shutdown ended in February after Congress passed a funding bill that allotted $1.4 billion to fund physical barriers along our southern border. This will pay for approximately 55 miles of new barriers. That amount was far short of President Trump’s $5.7 billion request, so he declared a national emergency in order to reallocate funds to strengthen security at our southern border. Many of our colleagues on the other side of the aisle have refused to accept there is a growing crisis at our southern border that requires us to act. The Department of Homeland Security has seen a 136 percent increase in the number of family units and unaccompanied children attempting to cross the border each month in Fiscal Year 2019. Over the past two years, ICE officers have arrested 266,000 aliens with criminal records, including those convicted of assaults, sex crimes and homicides. With a record number of individuals attempting to cross – 76,000 in February alone –resources for the hardworking men and women who protect the southern border are being squeezed. This makes it more difficult for them to stop dangerous drugs and criminals from entering the United States. Recognizing this, the administration declared a national emergency so it could use additional tools to strengthen border security. The ability to declare a national emergency was granted to the executive branch via the National Emergencies Act in 1976. Since then, 59 national emergencies have been declared, 30 of which remain in effect. Under the National Emergency Act, the president is given wide latitude to determine which situations are emergencies, and I believe the president is on sound legal footing with regard to the current emergency declaration. The president’s emergency declaration would allow the administration to take $3.6 billion from military construction projects which would not be contracted by October 31, 2019, to help pay for construction of physical barriers. The president has also identified $2.5 billion from the Department of Defense’s efforts to fight illegal drugs and $600 million from the Treasury Forfeiture Fund to help bolster border security. The ad- ministration has the ability to access these latter funds without a national emergency declaration. Since coming to the Senate, I have said that Congress has ceded too much power to the executive branch over the years, including when it passed the National Emergencies Act in 1976. There are also concerns that a future president may declare a national emergency to invoke a sweeping policy change on an issue such as climate change. Because of these concerns, I am interested in reviewing proposals to rein-in executive powers moving forward, including the future use of a national emergency declaration. The House and Senate passed a ‘resolution of disapproval’ on the president’s use of a national emergency declaration, which I voted against. Even before the Senate vote, President Trump announced he would veto the resolution. There are likely not enough votes to override a veto, therefore his emergency declaration will stand. I am committed to working with my colleagues on either side of the aisle to finish our appropriations work on time so we can avoid the chaos of the past several months. PIERRE, S.D. – South Dakota popular magazines, audio e-books students, educators, researchers for early learners and more withand others now have easy “click out physically entering a library,” and go” access anywhere within said State Librarian Daria Bossstate boundaries to high-quality man. electronic resources provided by Previously, when outside of the State Library to school and a library, users needed a State public libraries and all citizens Library e-card number and passstatewide. word to access these resources. “Thanks to a service called The electronic resources can be GeoIP authentication, residents found at https://library.sd.gov/ can access these electronic 2nd & 3rd, 9th & 10th, 16th & 17th • 1-3:00PM LIB/ERD/access/complete.aspx. December resources for homework help, Bring Your Cameras!School, academic and public college and career test prep libraries remain ‘hard-wired’ services, genealogy resources, for reliable access, and State Library e-cards remain available. For more information, contact your local librarian or the State Library at 1-800-423-6665. The State Library’s electronic resources are provided for free to all South Dakota residents through a combination of funding from the South Dakota State Library/Department of Education and federal funding through the Library Services and Technology Act and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Funds Available For Specialty Crop “Click And Go” Access To High-Quality Advancement E-Resources Now Available PIERRE, S.D. – The South Dakota Department of Agriculture (SDDA) announces that funds are available for Specialty Crop Block Grants. The funds can be used for marketing, promotion, research, food safety, nutrition, distribution and best management practices to advance the specialty crop industry. Specialty crops are generally defined as fruits, nuts, vegetables, honey and some turf and ornamental crops. A full list of specialty crops is also available on the SDDA website at http://sdda.sd.gov/. “These grants give farmers a way to increase the demand for the specialty crops they’re already growing,” said SDDA grant and loan specialist, Kimberly Sturm. “This year’s projects are maximizing the value of specialty crops and contributing to South Dakota’s greater agricultural economy.” Stakeholders have identified this year’s top priorities as enhancing the competitiveness of specialty crops through increased sales, increased consumption and sustainable practices of specialty crop production. The deadline for applications is May 1, 2019. Details explaining the application are available at https://sdda.sd.gov/grants/specialty-crop-block-grant/. “This program encourages production of local food within South Dakota because it offers additional resources to those interested in enhancing the specialty crop industry” said Sturm. Applications should be submitted via email to kimberly.sturm@state.sd.us, in Word format only. Applications are due May 1, 2019. For additional information please contact Sturm at 605.773.4516 or visit her at SDDA’s Office at 523 E Capitol Ave Pierre, SD 57501. Agriculture is a major contributor to South Dakota’s economy, generating $25.6 billion in annual economic activity and employing over 115,000 South Dakotans. The South Dakota Department of Agriculture's mission is to promote, protect and preserve this industry for today and tomorrow. Visit us online at sdda.sd.gov or find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Always LOW Liquor Prices! •Busch & Busch Light 30 pks ........... $15.79 •Old Milwaukee & Light 30 pks ........$14.99 •Miller High Life & Light 30 pks ........$14.99 •Bud & Bud Light 24 pks ........................$17.99 Find What You’re Looking For! in the Classifieds. In Print and Online! Call 665-5884 www.missourivalleyshopper.com 109 W. 3rd St. • 605-665-7865 * Yankton Meridian District * www.yanktonrexall.com ATTENTION TAXPAYERS: NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX INCREASE OF $20,000 RESOLUTION FOR OPT OUT THE GOVERNING BOARD OF Jamesville Township do state that the above said board is unable to operate under the tax limitation measure currently in statute. We therefore OPT OUT of such tax limitation in the amount of $20,000 starting with calendar year 2019 taxes payable in the calendar year 2020. This opt out will be for 5 years, which will be through taxes payable in the calendar year 2025. This action has been taken by the board and approved by at least a two-thirds vote of the board. This decision may be referred to a vote of the people upon a petition signed by at least five percent of the registered voters in the district and filed with the governing body within twenty days of the first publication of this decision. Free rooF Inspec tIon For HaIl an Unless this action is referred to a vote of the people and reversed by such vote, this resolution authorizes the county auditor to spread an excess levy to raise tax dollars in the above stated amount. Signed Kevin Kirschenman Township Clerk Think Spring! FABRIC SPECIALS! March 1 thru March 30 Hand Woven Rugs 20% off -- Excludes sale and special orders 44”/45” Flannel Reg. $7.99 - Sale $5.99 per yard 44/45” 100% Quilter’s Cotton Winter can do terrible things to your roof. Call today for a FREE inspection! 1600 Whiting Dr., Yankton, SD (605) 857-1472 Reg. $7.99 - Sale $5.99 per yard Upholstery 20% off Check out the VIRTUAL TOUR on www.inweavefabric.com 823 Central Ave. • Hawarden 1-800-646-9328 • 712-551-1523 www.inweaverugs.com • www.inweavefabric.com Mon.-Fri.: 9:30-5 • Sat.: 9:30-3 “We’ve Got You Covered” •NO OBLIGATION Inspection & Estimate • Insurance Preferred Contractor • Licensed / Bonded / Insured d storm da
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